Category Archives: Bloggers

Frostbytes: A peek at the prof’s online version of Day One

From my teacher-blog: a peek at the first official unofficial day of workshop, in which we leverage the tech to talk poetry, snow or no.

 

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Slow Thaw: A Fragment

Snow’s liminal whisper

between ice and slush,

unhushed, weeps

into stuttering gutters,

crushed. Machines sweep.

 

 

Resolved: A Year of Pleasure; or, Writing for Writing’s Sake

Happy New Year! As I begin The Year Without Facebook, I thought I’d also take part in WordPress’ PostADay challenge as a timely prompt. I have some new things in mind, not the least of which is my next book, which will make a pit stop as my dissertation.

Despite my flu-stuffed head, I’ve been reading a lot via Kindle and hope to post some discussion-worthy reviews and recommendations here. Feel free to join in via the Comments section. Also, watch for the Patio’s design to become a tad more reader-friendly as I revamp my web presence.

Perhaps these are New Year’s resolutions. Here’s some more:

Be kinder. Graduate school makes people cranky and crazy. I don’t like what’s rubbed off on me during the journey. Something about the fluorescent lights and the warrens of power makes otherwise intelligent and humane people go berserk. I don’t like some of the associated habits I’ve picked up and want to shake them off ASAP. I have not been myself.

Be healthier. I’ve made some progress, but have miles to go before I’m sleek. Objectively speaking, I should lose 50 pounds. That’s a lot. Twenty-eight minutes twice a week is not enough. My old friend Erica sent me a half-marathon training book last year, but (for other reasons) I wasn’t medically able to join her and Maria at the appointed day and time. Now she has challenged us to another half-marathon. I’ve avoided running in the neighborhood because it’s a little polluted and a little sketchy. I remember how passionate I was about running and swimming when I was a kid, and think I’d better find my way back to that feeling while I can still stretch my ligaments.

Woodshed. That’s what another old friend and now famous musician used to call “practicing”: “Can’t come! Gotta woodshed!” While I don’t consider myself nearly as good a poet as he is a musician, our friend wowed everyone with his early work ethic. I’m ashamed to say it, but it’s true: I’ve been slack. I’m moving from “not having enough time” to “stealing time” to “I will take time anytime” to write. I have a stack of specific, detailed craft-honing tasks. I have several particular projects and publications to finish this year. I am reclaiming the minefield that was once my home office. Life is short. Write like a motherfucker. (Hi, Ray and Brad.) I’m going back through various old standbys from the early days, reminding myself that this–writing–is fun. Not work. Fun. All the reading and study is important. Just reading, just writing, just messing about in boats–those are my passions. I will not die wishing I had followed my passions. I am marshalling all my passions into symbiosis.

Jettison. I have so much stuff. Books and clothes are my weaknesses. I’ve come to the point where I really can get rid of some books I know I’ll never look at again. I love my Kindle, but am never going to give up codex books. As for clothes: How can I have so much clothing, yet so little to wear? I’m tired of looking like a grad student or someone on a camping trip. I’m really tired of making do at Wal-Mart. Therefore, I have begun ruthlessly laying in a stash of work clothes and am about to donate a dresserful of stuff. When I lose a couple of sizes, I’ll get some new pants and I’ll be able to fit back into my stash of excellent work shirts. I’m having nightmares about Clinton Kelley and Stacey London snarking through my closet. I’d love five grand to shop Manhattan bare, but I’m not willing to let them trash the nice new pants and suit that need hemming. I’ve always preferred having a few nice things to tons of crap and I like to travel with one carry-on bag. How can I live aboard if I have to deal with all this stuff? Avast! Crap overboard!

Do what I love. I do not love being a graduate student. However, it is what I am doing right now in order to do what I love (writing) even better. Every day, I have the opportunity to teach people about the basics of good writing, introduce them to interesting and important ideas, and guide them through the maze between where they are and where they say they want to go. If I don’t love reading what students have written, then I have to ask myself whether I am a writer engaged in sparking a dialogue, or just a writing instructor copyediting my way through the disengaged meanderings of sleepwalkers. It’s one thing to have the fire. It’s another to pass it along. If I engage as a writer, albeit a far more advanced one, then I will be writing all day long, even when I’m grading, even when the class is shaking off its collective fuzzy head.

Dive, dive, dive. I can’t dive unless I’m in good enough shape to tote my own gear. Right now, I’d probably have to put on 40 pounds of lead just to get below the surface. I need to get in some crappy local dives and some shore dives away from the slick that was the Gulf Coast so that I can go on to the dive leadership part of the program. Oh, and I’d like to take a nitrox class. I’d really, REALLY like to take a rebreather course, but maybe that’ll be my graduation present to myself. Once the fiction exam is done, I’ll need to hit the water quickly.

Save money. I try to, and I do OK juggling my bills, stipend, and credit lines. However, I am a lot closer to alleged retirement than most of my cohort; I have a partner to take care of; and I need to finance my travel habit. Given the new wheels and the shrinking time to degree, a safety cushion is essential. Although I don’t like the freeway-flyer gig, I might pick up a little freelance on the side. Any such extra income will go straight into the Hands Off Savings Account. I have never paid someone else to roll my change.

Don’t waste time. Checking into Facebook for “just a second” adds up when you do it several times a day. I love my friends, but I doubt I’ll miss much by asking them (you!) to meet me elsewhere. “Wasting time” also means obsessing over the occasional hostile or triflin’ incident. I want to spend my time productively, and I derive no pleasure from getting swept up in other people’s headgames, real or imagined.

While most of these are ongoing projects, committing to specific, doable steps towards these goals is an act of resolution. I clarify my own desires. I write them down. I promise myself.

What do you promise yourself this year? What gift will you give yourself?

A year without Facebook

A herd of sheep as metaphor for Facebook users

Baaaaaaah humbug! I'm tired of Sheepbook's data-fleecing!

I’ve given my thousand-plus friends and “friends” fair warning: If they want to find me online in 2011, I won’t be on Facebook.

The combination of creepy face-recognition and geotagging was the final straw in Facebook’s series of ever-more-invasive presumptions. I grew sick and tired of hearing after the fact about new settings to turn off, new terms to opt out of, and new layouts to navigate. No longer do I feel conflicted about leaving the marketing orgy disguised as a virtual non-stop cocktail party. At first, I worried about losing track of what various far-flung friends were doing. Now, I have nothing to lose but acquaintances. I let folks know that I’m out as of 1/1/11. For one solid year, I vow not to update my status or to check into Sheepbook in any way whatsoever. At the end of the year, I promise to write about the experience. If I were not in grad school, where I’m obligated to respond to student e-mails and to tutor online, I’d swear off the entire digiverse and retreat to Walden, but this will have to do for now.

John Allemang’s “Technocurmudgeon: Confessions of a Facebook Heretic” in the Globe and Mail, here also tweaking Twitter, frames the effect nicely:

I don’t need to accumulate friends in quantity, but I want to know what drives my fellow beings. And what I discover in Twitter is the curious disconnect of all this connectedness: People I know as morally obtuse find the meaning of life in a cottage sunset, people I admire as artists can’t stop nattering about their frappuccinos, newbie political organizers I hoped would succeed get so caught up in Twitter self-congratulation that they forget to fight the real election on the streets.

What are we missing in life that makes us settle for these faux-social gatherings? You tell me. Except for the enforced sense of alienation in the workplace that comes from opting out – but boss, I thought you prized non-conformity – a life freed from the social networks’ demands should be a better way to pass the time.

And BBC Radio’s Rory Cellan-Jones did a great series, in which he interviewed EFF founder and WELL denizen John Perry Barlow about the virtues of meatspace versus the online mutton-pen:

Throughout our interview, the man who founded the Electronic Frontier Foundation kept harking back to his life in a small town in Wyoming, where he spent years as a cattle rancher.

Ever since, he told us, he’d been trying to find the same sense of small-town community in cyberspace. The Well, whose members met in “meatspace” as well as online, had been a great experience. He told how, at Well parties, the members of the community emerged blinking into the real world, and discovered the faces behind the words.

John Perry Barlow seemed disappointed by today’s social networks, and in particular the one that has really taken the online experience to the masses. “Facebook is like television, the opposite of what I was looking for,” he grumbled. “It’s the suburbs, not the global village.”

Way back when, say, in the early 1990s, when very few people had Internet access, launching an “app” meant typing ~vi, and the Web was text-only, I dipped briefly into the WELL. Eventually, I found cyberhomes at CREWRT-L and WOM-PO, and those friendships continue today–both in real life and online, if not necessarily via listserv. Today, I also listmom FORMALISTA, which is a closed list precisely because we wish to stay on topic, because we wish to avoid unproductive distractions, because we share a common interest in formal poetry by women and all considerations which the phrase implies.

By contrast, CREWRT-L has always been a heavy-traffic list, our discussions punctuated by news of spouse’s health, grandkid’s arrivals, and birdfeeder’s traffic, and we like it that way. The difference between CREWRT-L and Facebook is that a sense of community actually inheres. We see each other not only at AWP, for example, but also because we’re passing through town. We make allowances for our differences and we genuinely care for one another. We may “toot” a small success, but we don’t continually harp on our magnificence every time we finish a draft.

Facebook was originally conceived as a marketing platform, a tool for manufacturing popularity, and popularity is the fetish of the insecure. It allows one to post commercials about oneself in real time to an adoring circle of dozens. In short, it makes one feel special. Temporarily. Until one needs another hit. The first step, say anonymous addicts everywhere, is to admit one’s powerlessness.

If you want to surrender control, you’d better know to whom you’re capitulating. Some people say, “Privacy is dead.” Let’s assume such is the case (which I don’t actually believe to be true.) Discretion, however, survives.

So what’s your story? Are you sick of trying to keep up with Facebook’s periodic flux in terms? How much online data is too much? Would you like to punch Mark Zuckerberg in his smug little face? Are you ramping down, swearing off, or otherwise reorganizing your “online presence” in 2011? If you could have only e-mail and ONE other online means of communication, what would that be? Have you considered unplugging entirely? Confess your techno-conflicts below.

And if you’re reading this via Facebook, please consider responding on Every Poet Needs a Patio instead.

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I can haz e-books I paid for, Amazon?

I left this note–well, essay–on amazon.com’s Kindle Customer Service board:

My dad bought me a nice new Kindle DX as a gift. Meanwhile, he loaned me his while I crammed for Ph.D. exams. I purchased a few books, downloaded many classics, and uploaded study notes, lists, individual docs, etc. All well and good. I decided I much prefer the smaller Kindle and so he’s taking the DX. However, it’s my understanding that, because I bought my obscure literary criticism on his machine, that I cannot transfer those titles to my Kindle.

This is a major, major DRM issue. I in fact purchased the book on his Kindle, and we in fact are swapping possession of our respective Kindles, both of which he purchased.

If you look at our accounts, you will see that we have spent TENS of thousands of dollars at amazon.com over the years. I think that, as a goodwill gesture, you should do whatever is necessary to tweak the code on these individual downloads OR to issue an immediate credit back so that I might repurchase said books on my own machine.

If not, I would be extremely wary of continuing to use the Kindle at all, and would go directly to a more user-friendly version. I understand the issues with DRM and piracy, and (as an author) I strongly support protecting *author’s* rights. However, in cases such as this, clearly the customer who has paid for the use of this particular e-book should certainly be accommodated, as the book is not being pirated or even read/shared by two people.

You might counter that you have no way of knowing this. Given that each download has its own identification, I doubt that. It’s easy enough to see later whether I’d cracked this individual copy of Spiller’s _The Development of the Sonnet_ and sold thousands of copies on the international black market (think of all the sonnet specialists drooling for such contraband!– all 12 of us!).

Yet, cynically, retread versions of public-domain classics (often poorly formatted) are shamelessly sold on amazon.com. Sold? Someone downloads a work from Project Gutenberg, “designs” a “cover,” sells it on amazon.com, and repeats the process?… And I can’t get a book that I paid for on my dad’s account into my account when it already exists physically on the Kindle I put it into? And he just paid for the new, expensive Kindle?…

In this case, I suggest that sound judgment should override mindless policy. I cannot afford to repurchase titles which I’ve already bought and being forced to do so is not in any way fair. I’m certain a judge would agree.

Surely this can be done on the back end via the users’ web interfaces. Create a particular link: “Transfer ownership”–make the person read and agree to swear to whatever legalese that covers the situation I’ve described–and then allow User Account A to e-mail the book(s) in question to User Account B ONE TIME ONLY via wireless. Your tech people could set up a database to track such transfers. And you most certainly should NOT charge any fee for doing so. If User B subsequently upgrades, he or she should be able to put all existing purchases into the new device.

Philosophically speaking, I think the current situation overreaches reasonable transfers. Again, I stress: I am NOT advocating that amazon.com create a Napster– or LimeWire-sized venue for mass file abuse. I do think it obvious that situations like this offer amazon.com an opportunity to demonstrate respect for its loyal customers.

Finally, I think it’s only a matter of time before some kind of system for transferring between users comes up. Whatever that might be, I hope that the author benefits from each use, just as recording artists and actors earn residuals when their works are played. I wonder whether ASCAP/BMI offer useful models for this.

What I enormously resent as a writer are huge publishing companies whose “pay” for, say, encyclopedia articles doesn’t even cover copy costs, yet who retain all digital rights and then resell MY work for enormous sums via library subscriptions, for example. I worry that, despite the savings on freight, paper, ink, distribution, etc. the middlemen and weasels will earn a disproportionate percentage of rights at the author’s expense.

Anyway, this is much longer than I’d planned. I hope you find this persuasive and that you will return my obscure literary analysis purchases as soon as possible.

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From the (real, not digital) archives

While I was in New Orleans last time, I managed to squeeze in a couple of hours at the UNO Archive, looking up as many old bylined Driftwood and Gambit articles as I could. It occurs to me that I missed a couple (I was rocketing through these bound copies at lightning speed two hours before closing), but here is a relatively complete list of my early newspaper work in New Orleans, plus some other stuff accounted for in less-than-resumé form:

UNO Driftwood (may be others ca. 1983-1985; missing one on visually-impaired tech lab)
18 Sept 86, “Russian enrollment reasons quite diverse”,11
2 Oct 86, “Funds allocated to Language Lab”, 3
30 Oct 86, “Lambda Chi Alpha opens haunted house,” 2
13 Nov 86, “Asbestos in library”, 2
13 Nov 86, “Psych, Bio animal labs get grant”, 18
20 Nov 86, “SGA treasurer resigns at meeting”, 3
4 Dec 86, “Boggs speaks about Congress”, 1-2
4 Dec 86, “Search committee members named”, 1, 3
14 Jan 87, “Coping with another hike”, 2
22 Jan 87, “UNO celebrates King holiday”, 1-2
22 Jan 87, “Professor published” (no byline), 2
22 Jan 87, “North: ‘Raise Contra money'”, 3, 10
22 Jan 87, “Damn this traffic jam”, 6
29 Jan 87, “UNO, Tulane, Xavier march in Georgia” (with photo), 2

Gambit (bylined pieces only–many, many more small news items not credited, esp. politics/environment–missing AZT story, cover story on public housing, perhaps others)
25 Apr 87, “Tales of Four Craftsmen,” 27
11 Aug 87, “Bump in the Night–A Word from Morgus’ Master”, 17
25 Aug 87, “Seniority counts…Sort of”, 23
1 Sept 87, “Two City Ballet: Risk Taking that Worked”, 23
8 Sept 87, “Collapsing Building; Collapsing Laws”, 12-13
29 Sept 87, “Medieval German, and Lots of Laughs”, 21
26 Jan 88, “A Hometown Wine”, 19
23 Feb 88, “Maunsel White: Changing New Orleans Forever”, 13
1 Mar 88, “Looking Up: Canal Street”, 17
8 Mar 88, “Public Education: The Voodoo of Statistics”, 14-15
15 Mar 88, “Housing Relocation: The Dallas Example”, 8
28 Jun 88, “Grand Isle’s Growing Pains”, 14-15
5 Jul 88, “Combatting a Stigma; Or a Story that Got Lost in Translation”, 18
26 Jul 88, (Cover) “Education in Louisiana. Is the bad image being erased?”; includes “Workshop Way: See Sister Grace Teach”, 13-15 and “The Politics of Higher Education”, 17
9 Aug 88, “The Politics of Cable Access TV”, 18-19
6 Sep 88, “Cable TV: The Past, the Promises, and the Future”, 13-16
27 Sep 88, “The Numbers Game: Rating New Orleans Radio”, 14
11 Oct 88, (Cover) Louisiana, The Disappearing State, 13-15; includes “Mister Sandman: A New Mayor Takes On Grand Isle’s Shifting Sands”, 14 (1988 Brown Pelican Award for Environmental Reporting with Errol Laborde and Stephanie Riegel)
25 Oct 88, “Dining Room Detente: Smoking or Non-Smoking”, 25
25 Oct 88, “Running the Show: Hotel Fod and Beverage Manager”, 43
1 Nov 88, “Streetcars: Modernization Vs. Preservation”, 8, 11
8 Nov 88, (Cover) “Dying for a Drink of Water”, 13-16; includes “The Brief and Strange History of Reveilletown, Louisiana”, 16 (also up for ’88 Brown Pelican Award, but we beat ourselves out with the coastal erosion issue)
6 Dec 88, “Dialing for Dollars: South Central Bell Has a Plan”, 15
13 Dec 88, “Lafayette: Bouncing Back”, 22
13 Dec 88, “Seattle’s Comeback”, 23
20 Dec 88, “Twilight Zoning: Rethinking the City’s Zoning Laws”, 14-15
27 Dec 88, “Bluesful Radio: Some Radio Stations Experienced the Blues, Others Play It”, 12
27 Dec 88, “Is There a Renaissance Along N. Rampart?”, 14
3 Jan 89, “A New Curriculum A New Year; Some people go back to school for fun, for others it’s a matter of survival”, 17-19
17 Jan 89, (Cover) “Encore! The Symphony’s Return”, 15-16 (17)
24 Jan 89, “Bar None: Return of the Coffeehouses”, 24
31 Jan 89, “Banding Together”, 24
31 Jan 89, “Who Is That Mask Man?”, 26-27
7 Mar 89, “Airport ’89”, 17-19
21 Mar 89, “The Vieux Carré’s Termite War,” 16
28 Mar 89, “Hidden New Orleans: As Others See It”, 164
4 Apr 89, “Watching the Kids: Questions of Child Abuse”, 16-17 [Last Issue]
4 Apr 89, “Passing Through: From the Pages of the Quarter’s Used Book Shops”, 27 [Last Issue]

* * *
Some other selected bits that include my writing relevant to New Orleans:

Freelance Stuff
IMPACT
Wavelength (N.O. music documentary)
OffBeat
New Orleans Magazine (some bylined, some not)
Louisiana Life (some bylined, some not)
The Advocate (dentists refusing PWAs treatment; mule carriage drivers mocking gay bar patrons)

Corporate
ca. 1989 Hertz Rent-A-Car guide to New Orleans
AP Radio/wire (New Orleans bureau stringer; covered Angola Death Row execution)
freelance PR writing for Zehnder clients Sav-A-Center, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, others

nola.com (as the only local on a four-person dot-com start-up; established local working relationships with NOPD, city, oriented staff to Carnival coverage, culture, etc. )
“Doubloons: The Shiiing Is the Thing” (article is occasionally plagiarized online, if that’s a compliment)
photo essays on Blaine Kern floatmaking, Aquarium of the Americas
Mardi Gras guide
other stuff

Various online pit stops
kd5qel.blogspot.com
Show Your Colors
Every Poet Needs A Patio
lambdaliterary.org (dispatches from Saints and Sinners litfest)

Encyclopedia articles
Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature (Kate Chopin)

* * *
Some things aren’t on this list, like an early article about Brennan’s for Gambit, but I hope to make another trip to the archives soon. I’d like to reconstitute my physical portfolio, which has been thinned out over the years, so that I never lose it again.

Facebook, friends, and fragility

A blast from the past: a post on finally hearing from Tom AC5TM, to whom “Stepping Out of the Car, After Not Recognizing an Old Friend’s House” is dedicated, in the days following Katrina and the levee break.

I’m keeping mostly to myself as comps arrive and as the nastiness of K+5 stuffed emotions occasionally bubble up. Poetry and planning are the two best ways to cope.

I’ve also been pretty well kicked in the gut over Facebook recently, so am thinking long and hard about who I really want to spend time dealing with (as I have no time whatsoever). All my real friends who read this: Come find me here. Come find me via real e-mail. Come find me via snail-mail–now THERE’S something new and different. If you want my real e-mail or my real mailing address, just ask. Maybe I’ll come back to FB, o crack pipe, o conflict, but I’m going to quit using it as Twitter, probably to the delight of hundreds. Perhaps I will no longer attract freaks and annoy acquaintances.

One of the great disadvantages of grad school is that, given our overheated schedules, there’s never any time to develop real friendships or a genuine sense of community. FB has filled that void, to a certain extent, because I could at least banter with old friends far away. I miss quality time in the real world with a few good friends. I’ve been reminded what the word “friend” constitutes. And because 20 years blows by in a second, I’d rather be alone most of the time, or with my partner and my family, than spread myself as thin as I have been in recent years. Life’s too short for time-wasting foolishness. I am no longer opening the door to my precious time unless I have a damn good reason for doing so.

Is your life materially better because of your electronic gadgets? Seriously? Of course I get the irony that I’m typing this on a computer and flinging it into the digiverse. As Katrina bore down on New Orleans and the Gulf Coast, I tried to use social media as if I were still at CNN. I wanted to disseminate information through backchannels. I wanted to know how and where other poets and writers, many of whom are friends, were at the time. I wanted to do something useful, not just sit there and not report on the biggest news story ever in the place I know the best on Earth. So I made do, both in Atlanta online and in Mississippi via amateur radio.

Five years later, the city was fighting back like mad and making progress, and then BP turned the entire Gulf Coast into its own personal chemistry lab. Scratch all the plans we’d made for moving here or there. Scratch everything I know and love. At least on Facebook I’ve been able to communicate with my fellow New Orleanians, now living all over the country/world. At least it was something I could hold onto.

Now I am nobody, living noplace.

My closest friends from high school live in Australia, Spain, and Massachusetts.

My country has done little to nothing for my city, my state, my region over the past five years.

What else is there for me here? Seriously?

All I want to do is write my dispatches, whether poems, articles, or novels, from a quiet and relatively human-scale coastal village lacking DSL. Maybe I’ll be lucky enough to teach those who want to learn about language and literature. My standard of living is modest. I don’t need (nor do I want) a ton of money. I want to pace my life according to the tides, the fish running, the dolphins and ospreys making their daily round trips, the sun sizzling into the ocean on the horizon. I want to live somewhere where I can shore dive every day and watch gobies in their natural habitat. I want a good tropical thunderstorm again. I want to dash under the patio roof, the water pounding the tin, rivulets roping from the eaves, to sit on the steps and drink beer and play the guitar and talk all afternoon. I want the kind of friends who know how that feels.

And the Clouds Broke…

I’m back in Atlanta after driving all night from New Orleans. I’ll update this post after work. However, I do want to say that yesterday’s readings were better than church, better than therapy, better than the best literary fest you could attend. All my writer friends and I had church, as it were, with Mona Lisa Saloy‘s summoning the spirit by calling out, “My grandma and your grandma…” and all of us responding, “Sittin’ on the bayou…”, and Errol Laborde‘s benediction: “Come home. The city needs you.”

And as I headed east on I-10, as I began to tear up about leaving where I feel most at home in this world, the gray squall that had hovered over the city all weekend, that rain I was sure was the tears of all the living and the dead, broke open above the Danzinger Bridge. Across from that platinum brilliance, a full rainbow dropped over the mostly-unoccupied shells of apartments near Bullard Road. I wept, hot-faced, so hard that I had to pull the car over. When I was able to go on, John Boutte’ sang his Katrinafied version of “Louisiana 1927” and I pulled over again, this time at Bayou Sauvage, and I got down on one knee before this sign and took photo after photo after photo, as if no one would believe such a story otherwise.

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Katrina, Five Years Later: Too Much Left Undone

Joan of ArcI thank God that I am in New Orleans today, writing this. 1,464 Louisianians are not able to give any testimonies of their experiences.

I am also grateful and overjoyed to have met so many fine bloggers and other dedicated New Orleanians at Rising Tide V. Seeing friends in person, some of whom I haven’t seen in years, and making new friends was the best possible therapy for this New Orleanian in exile. Rising Tide is New Orleans’ brain trust, and certainly its best grassroots think tank.

Today I’ll head over to Garden District Book Shop for the New Orleans: What Can’t Be Lost book signing. In attendance:

Lee Barclay, Christopher Porché West, Sunday Angleton, Jason Berry, Simonette Berry, Amanda Boyden, Julia Carey, Tara Jill Ciccarone, Joshua Clark, Morgan Clevenger, Lucas Díaz-Medina, Joel Dinerstein, Louis Edwards, Gina Ferrara, Lee Meitzen Grue, Sarah K. Inman, Julie Kane, Errol Laborde, Katheryn Krotzer Laborde, Louis Maistros, Alex McMurray, Maria Montoya, Kami Patterson, Valentine Pierce, Dr. Mona Lisa Saloy, Henri Schindler, Barbara Trevigne, Jerry W. Ward, Jr., Missy Wilkinson, and Kelly Wilson.

Then, I’ll hit Tulane University’s Kendall Cram Room for “Remembering Katrina: A 5th Anniversary Poetry Reading.”On the bill: Brenda Marie Osbey, Yusef Komunyakaa, Peter Cooley, Nicole Cooley, Kay Murphy, Brad Richard, Alison Pelegrin, and Martha Serpas. What an incredible reading this will be. You should get there if at all humanly possible.

Too many of the poor who have survived are still living in broken-down houses, in between too many boarded-up houses, with little hope from either the schools or from Baton Rouge for improving their economic and educational situation. The University of New Orleans continues to be slighted and is fighting for its life, along with every other public higher education institution in the state. Our President is going to speak about Katrina at Xavier today. I hope he gets around the city to places other than the usual advance-man scenic stand-ups depicting progress. Given the Gulf fiasco, I won’t hold my breath. On Friday, street flooding in the bowl where Xavier sits blocked northbound traffic on Carrollton all the way back to the Archdiocese within minutes. Clearly nothing is being done about that kind of street flooding. Moreover, adding drainage capacity is not enough to compensate for the greater volumes in the water cycle. We need federal dollars to rebuild and to clean up, but we also need federal mandates for green energy and transportation. If you don’t believe in climate change yet, please drive your SUV under the overpass at Carrollton and I-10 and kiss my purple, green, and gold ass. Until Americans change our fossil-fuel worshipping ways, we will continue to push the residents of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast under the oil-slicked, Corexit-filled water. As New Orleans and the Gulf Coast go, so goes America.

At some point, I’ll post a longer piece reflecting on the journey home, which is, even at this late date, a work in progress. And before I press the START button in the rental hybrid car, I’ll take a walk on the levee, the way I used to take for granted I would do all my life, and remember The City That Care Forgot.

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Rising Tide V – TREME in da house!!!!

TREME PANEL
Maitri Erwin, Back of Town: Blogging Treme founder
Lolis Eric Elie, Treme/ex-Times-Picayune/documentarian
Becky Northcut, VirgoTex
Davis Rogan, musician/Treme
Dave Walker, Times-Picayune TV critic
Eric Overmeyer, playwright/TV writer/producer, “Treme” co-creator

ERWIN: Your connections to New Orleans? (ROGAN/ELIE natives)
NORTHCUT: dad a shrimper… only news that mattered was on the blogs.
WALKER: Chicago, came here for job at T-P. Heard Wild Tchoupitoulas on WXRT in Chicago.
OVERMEYER: Grew up in Seattle, dad came here on business, bought back Oscar “Papa” Celestine record back, plated “Marie Laveau” over and over and over. Also would put on the Wild Tchoupitoulas record and people would come over and say I don’t get it.

ROGAN: Can’t portray lives of N.O. musicians and chefs w/o cursing and smoking pot.
ELIE: Out of towners re: Carnival on St. Charles, locals their own thing, but truth is you see Carnival from where you live. Tells story without excluding folks.

Dumbest New Orleans show/movie?
ELIE: “Orleans” w/Larry Hagman–played a sitting judge; alligator common La. lawn pets, so no surprise this character had one. What reality is this from? Recently did a tribute to “Frank’s Place” (applause)
ROGAN: Thought “Panic in the Streets” was excellent.
WALKER: I wrote 1001 columns about “K-ville.” I think it was a noble effort to throw production dollars at New orleans. Eric wrote great two-part piece on nola.com about what the challenge was for K-Ville; hope you go back and read it because gives insight into TV production biz.

ELIE: Eric and David have done their homework… what I bring to it, Davis and Tom as well, is how best to reflect the scene.
ROGAN: We (locals on Treme) kind of fill in the color.
OVERMEYER: In a way, it’s a historical drama, it takes place 4 yrs in the past, try to be as accurate as we can; take some liberties, sometimes make mistakes, but always trying to bounce it off what happened in Feb. 2006. New Orleanians have diff recollections about what happened around certain events, so sometimes say, well we have to go with that version because we can’t nail it down definitively.

ERWIN:How do you nail it down before the show?
WALKER: Knew would have to find a ay to deal w/torrent of cultural refs that are not necessary for N.O. viewers. So came up with a way to basically drain all the enjoyment out of the viewing experience. (Laughter). Usually I would get an advance screener on Friday–spent a lot of nice spring weekends inside–but found a way to get other people to [resources] … who Smiley Lewis was, why it was funny when Davis didn’t hear the knock at the door.

Becky ran a blog called Got That New Package (Ashley Morris, Ray Shea, Scout, Nancy, etc.)–Back of Town is basically a continuation of that effort. How did it come to be?

NORTHCUT: Shared political sensibility also shared w/this room, failed institutions. Was originally about The Wire— I think Ray may have known about the show (in process) in N.O.–I’d ask Ray, and Ray would say ask Ashley, and he’d say ask Nancy, etc.

ELIE: Dawn Logsdon came up with idea of documentary about Treme. We grew up in Carrollton. Wanted to give some historical context to the builders, craftsmen, etc. who grew up in Treme. Dovetailed with her father’s work (the late historian). It’s been a big part of what I’ve been able to bring to the table, Great theme song too–thanks to John Boutte.

–Wil Treme be similar to The Wire: characters changing, or will it always be about post-K recovery?
OVERMEYER-Fall06-Spring 07. Fall 07-Spring 08 if it runs another season. Always going to be about the recovery in some way. Feel compelled to repeat what David and I have ad nauseam, which is this show is not The Wire. Blessing/curse: extraordinary success of The Wire allowed HBO to do Treme–without that success, we wouldn’t be sitting here in this room. OTOH, a lot of viewers of The Wire who tuned in looking for gun battles disappointed because they got a secondline and a guy playing trombone and a cook in a restaurant sauteeing crawfish–cdn’t be more ifferent. Also interested in big canvas–story of a city– and of characters. Some similarities, but they’re as different as N.O. and Baltimore are diff. I think we’ve driven away people who were interested in The Wire #2 and gotten people interested in Treme.
ROGAN: “The Wire is War and Peace; Treme is Anna Karenina.”

[The flashback was David Mills‘ idea–applause]

ELIE: I hope we can give people a sense of why as late as 2006, everything was not OK. (applause)

OVERMEYER: cleared uses of Ashley Morris’ FYYFF and etc.

ELIE: I think time will make it a lot easier for people to watch the show who can’t watch it now.

RAY SHEA: Lot of people in N.O. who have never been to a second line and probably will never go, who have this Katrina experience as well…will the community of characters expand?

OVERMEYER: Will have all chars but Creighton…adding some, dealing with return of crime, breakdown of criminal justice system, where did the $ go, the school system to some extent, mental health issues…the thing about 2nd season: 2nd year harder than first for some New Orleanians.

KIM MARSHAL: I want more Aunt Mimi and more Phyllis Montana Leblanc!

PFISTER SISTER HOLLY BENTSEN: LONG TESTIMONY ABOUT HER EXPERIENCE AS FORMER NOPS SCHOLTEACHER.
(Will there be a schoolteacher in new season?)

ELIE: Trying to figure out how to address the charter school issue.
ROGAN: Think the whole ed system gives itself over to Overmeyer/Simon gray area that I would hope gets addressed.

ELIE: One of my complaints is that cultural development is primarily between Warehourse District and French Quarter, into Frenchman, but as it extends into other neighborhoods (Kermit Ruffins’, etc.), hope we can see that culture grow as well.

QUESTION: Diaspora thank you for show. Does racial harmony on show grow out of certain cultural scenes?
ROGAN: N.O. music scene more integrated–hope that is an accurate portrayal.
OVERMEYER: Getting into more difficult issues in Season 2.
ELIE: Not attempting toescape the hard q’s, but have to undertsand what gets in cluded in partic show in partic season. Crime issue not as significant in Fall 2005, therefore you don’t see it. Re: music, who plays w/whom, experiences folks have, try to look at various ways in which this music is made and by whom.

QUESTION: What are your guiding principles? What are the common principles that you might share as you strive to tell a certain type of story? Was shocked by Tulane professor who said, “Well! They’re keeping identity studies! Getting rid of engineering!” It kind of jarred.
OVERMEYER: That list was accurate. For Creihton we felt that this was accurate reflection of what his POV would be. You can’t confuse the staff with the characters…we have to serve the characters first That’s not to say–I’d be surprised if there’s a Republican on the staff–there are big disagreements–but it’s important not to use characters to make an (ideological) point–you need that (character development) for conflict and drama.
ELIE: I want to make it clear: We are free to write whatever we want to write. David and Eric are free to change whatever they want to change. A big one is to have a roundness of character, to have some sympathy to some of the things the characters do. An NOPD character: “you have no idea what it as like, I slept in the car for days,” etc. Give the character enough for you to disagree with the character. I hope it results in something approaching the truth.

ELIE: All the folks who came here to help rebuild the city are now ambassadors for the city…We do have viewers in other parts of the country who can see something that’s not totally contingent on being from here.
OVERMEYER: One of our concerns: can you convey New Orleans? Not entirely convinced it’s doable or possible.
WALKER: Early on, I think I wrote it was a challenging/difficult thing to do. Think interest is widespread–backed up by cumulative audience….I think it succeeds, but I know the subcultures better than someone coming completely cold to the show would. Interesting conversations with other TV critics in US–“don’t know but I’m going to find out”. Will have another audience with DVDs–think it has a long life and people will be discovering it years from now,

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